6 Reasons to Get a Grip on Depression


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(c) 2013 John Thurman from Dia de Los Muertos Y Marigold Parade, Albuquerque

So, what will reading Get a Grip on Depression do for the reader?

by John Thurman

Depression negatively impacts your personal life, relationships, and business. Recent studies indicate that 16% of Americans will have at least one episode of Major Depression in their lifetime.

The sad news is that few will seek help for it.

The purpose of Get a Grip on Depression is to help you better understand depression and to learn proven, effective ways to manage depression using a combination of the latest research and the ancient, but still relevant, principles of Scripture. Practically speaking, this workbook is designed to help you:
   
•   Boost your mood naturally

•    Understand the cause of depression

•    Lower the risk and impact of depression

•   Review meaningful stories and principles from Scripture

•   Overcome mild depression

•  Increase a sense of purpose, well-being, and mission

•   Supplement your depression treatment

•  Prevent relapse

•  Relieve the residual symptoms of major depression

•  Incorporate biblically-based, spiritual practices to alleviate and reduce the impact of                  depression

You’ve heard the old saying, “Insanity is doing the same thing repeatedly and expecting a different outcome.” Maybe it’s time to stop doing the same old thing.

This resource will offer a fresh perspective to depression. Some readers may believe this approach is too indirect and not “clinical” enough. My encouragement to you is to remember that depression constricts your opinion of your capabilities and keeps you in a comfort zone of weak and slow. Get a Grip on Depression is about trying something a little different. If you are currently being treated with medication or counseling, then please continue. This resource will supplement the hard work you are already doing.

One of the principles for getting a grip on depression is personal responsibility and agency, which simply means you are an active player in your own recovery. It is important for us to focus on responsibility and to be forward-looking. Seeing ourselves as perpetual victims of childhood or adult trauma tends to make us a prisoner of the past and gnaws at our sense of responsibility. All successful counseling has two things in common: It is forward-looking, and it requires assuming personal responsibility.

Excerpt from Get a Grip On Depression p 17

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